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Archive for March, 2012


We thought it would happen, but we didn’t think it would happen three days before the end of the month, but this afternoon LatinoRebels.com (a site run and administered a dedicated group of about 20 social media influentials that is dedicated to alternative media, opinion, commentary, politics, Latino culture, history, analysis, comedy, independent journalism, blogging, music, and general mayhem) eclipsed 100,000 pageviews (and over 50,000 unique visitors) in the month of March. It is the first time our company has reached this number in a month’s worth of traffic. The 100,000 pageviews in March also eclipsed our total traffic of 2011, from when we launched the site on May 5, 2011 until December 31. Here is a screen capture from our Google Analytics:

To everyone who has read us, THANK YOU. Our latest web rankings today also pushed our Alexa ranking into the following numbers, making us one of the top (if not, the top) independently-owned Latino media websites in the US (and we won’t complain about our global ranking either). We are entering our last month before our one-year anniversary and we feel that 2012 will be another banner year. Crazy.

So how do we feel today about our latest news? Hit it, House of Pain.

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A series of new polls this month have been released and the news does not look good for Puerto Rican pro-statehood and Republican governor Luis Fortuño, who is in the incumbent in a November election that will determine both his fate as the island’s leader as well as take a temperature of where Puerto Rico stands in its political relationship with the United States, which invaded the island in 1898 and still maintains it as a territory.

El Diario in New York published the latest El Nuevo Día numbers of an island poll where Fortuño is up against pro-Commonwealth candidate Alejandro García Padilla and pro-Independence candidate Juan Dalmau. Here are the poll results:

38% for García Padilla

30% for Fortuño

4 % for Dalmau

13% said they will not vote.

12% are undecided.

In the race for Resident Commissioner (Puerto Rico’s non-voting representative of the US Congress), the results are as follow:

Resident Commissioner Pedro Pierluisi (a Democrat but also a member of Fortuño’s pro-statehood party) got 39% in the poll.

Rafael Cox Alomar, who is running with García Padilla on the PPD (Popular Party) ticket, got 32%.

Pro-Independence candidate Juan Manuel Mercado got 4%.

El Nuevo Día also ran a poll regarding the island’s political status vote, which will be held the same day as the race for Governor and Resident Commissioner, and this is what it published. This is a two-step vote, with the first vote asking island voters to choose if they would wish to keep the island’s current commonwealth status or change it, and the second vote asking them to choose their preference (statehood, enhanced commonwealth, independence). Here are those results:

Part 1

50% of voters chose to maintain the current territorial relationship with the United States.

29% of voters wanted to change the relationship with the United States.

The rest for now are either undecided or not voting.

Part 2

42% of voters chose the enhanced commonwealth option.

32% of voters chose statehood.

3% of voters chose independence.

The rest for now are either undecided or not voting.

These poll numbers, at least for the political status questions, provide a marked shift from the El Vocero polls last month, which had statehood wining by a slim margin. In that poll 41% of Puerto Rican voters chose statehood, as opposed to 37% for enhanced commonwealth, but according to El Nuevo Día, enhanced commonwealth has a double-digit margin of preference now.

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A year hasn’t even gone by since LatinoRebels.com launched on May 5, 2011 and the merry and mischievous band of social media influentials who formed together to create a site that spoke to their world through comedy, commentary, analysis, activism, politics, social media, music, and independent journalism has become one of the country’s (and now the world’s) top independent sites for US Latino content, news, issues, and just general mayhem. In just 10 months, some very cool and very amazing things have happened. Here are just a few, and yes, we will have more to share on May 5, 2012, when LatinoRebels.com turns 1:

  • As of tonight March 26, 2012, according to our Google Analytics, LatinoRebels.com has gotten over 176,000 unique vistors, with over 220,000 visits and over 317,000 pageviews. We still have about six weeks until we complete our first year online, and we feel that we are on target to complete over 250,000 uniques and 400,000 page views in our first year of existence.
  • As of March 20, 2012, we have already exceeded our total 2011 traffic. In other words, all the traffic we got from May, 2011 until December 2011 (eight months), we exceeded that number in less than three months in 2012. We have experienced about a 240% increase in our traffic in the last two months, and this week alone (March 19-March 26) we have gotten over 15,000 unique visitors and over 25,099 pageviews. In addition, with just five days left in March, we are on target to achieving 100,000 pageviews and over 50,000 unique visitors. Spread over a year, that would come out to 1.2 million pageviews and 600,000 unique visitors. Those figures were just pipe dreams, now we are in the running to achieve that goal.
  • Our current Alexa ranking for March 26, 2012 is this:

  • Compete.com is another site we use, besides our own Google Analytics and WordPress stats and this is what they list the page at as of February, 2012. According to Compete.com, we say a 12.16% increase in unique visitors from January 2012 to February 2012 and we are currently ranked 181,304 in the world, having moved up another 29,254 slots up the rankings in just one month.

  • According to Quantcast, which we activated for our site on March 9, 2012 (so we don’t have a full month’s worth of data), these are our current rankings and daily traffic for last week as of tonight:

To all who have been there with us from the very beginning, thank you. This amazing growth took some luck but it also shows that if you write good content, stay true to yourself and independent, use social media and authentic networking and relationship-building to complement your page’s goal, and curate content that you feel matters to your community, you will attract interest. We will continue to be who we are, even if we just had one reader (or even if we had no readers). However, we are not going to lie about this: this feels pretty good. The Rebeldes thank you all!

Independent journalism and content creation lives. We are proud to be Rebeldes.

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Imagine if you were protesting somewhere in America today, and police officers started shooting at you and your group, even though you carried no weapons and had no intent of harming others. Imagine if these shootings led to innocent people dying. Would you be outraged? Would you even care?

75 years ago today, the Ponce Massacre happened in Puerto Rico. It is a fact, and our dear friends at Pa’lante Latino (co-published with Latino Rebels) offer a very detailed and accurate account of the tragedy that happened in March 21, 1937 on Palm Sunday in Ponce. It is safe to say that when you turn on your news today in the United States, no one will be talking about it, no will be remembering this brutal attack on American citizens. Even the Puerto Rican government will stay silent.

Here is the post from Pa’alante:

On Palm Sunday, March 21st 1937, The Puerto Rican Nationalist Party peacefully marched to recognize the ending of slavery by the governing Spanish National Assembly in 1873 and in protest of the imprisonment of Nationalist leader Pedro Albizu Campos by the U.S. government in Ponce, Puerto Rico.

Days before the peaceful march, organizers received legal permits by the mayor of Ponce José Tormos Diego. But when the U.S. appointed Governor of Puerto Rico, General Blanton Winship, heard of the protest he immediately demanded the permits be revoked. Governor Winship then directed Colonel Orbeta to gather police units from across the island and stop the protest. It was reported that over 200 heavily armed police officers surrounded the protesters.

As Puerto Rico’s national song “La Borinqueña” began playing, the demonstrators started marching. The police fired at them from four different positions for over 15 minutes killing 17 men, 1 woman, a 7-year-old girl, wounding over 235 and arresting over 150 unarmed protesters.

Afterwards, an investigation took place on whether the protesters or the police shot first. Governor Winship pressured the district attorney’s office and prosecutor Rafael Pérez Marchand to not file charges against the police officers and arrest more Nationalists but Pérez Marchand resigned, seeing that he was not allowed to conduct proper investigation. The US Commission for Civil Rights, led by Arthur Garfield Hays, independently investigated the incident and concluded the March 21st event constituted a massacre.

On July 25th 1938 Governor Winship held a military parade in Ponce, Puerto Rico to prove his success against the Nationalists. But the parade was met with gunfire aimed at the grandstand where the Governor sat in an attempt to assassinate him. This was the first time an attempt on a Puerto Rico’s Governor life was made.

Today, We remember the dead and wounded on that unfortunate day and pray a time will come when justice is served. Pa’lante!

The video below shows actual footage of the Ponce Massacre:

Original post found on Pa’lante Latino.

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ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED IN LATINOREBELS.COM

There is reality and then there is Macondo, the fictional town of irrationality made so memorable by the writings of Gabriel García Márquez. Tonight, GOP nominee Mitt Romney is living in Macondo, after trouncing his opponents to gain 20 delegates in the Puerto Rico’s GOP primary.

Source: CNN Politics

Romney, who needed a victory and a resounding one, is clearly out of of touch if he considers that his Puerto Rico win is a feather in his elusive Don Quijote quest to win a serious share of the US Latino vote in the national presidential elections. (The former Massachusetts governor gained more than 80% of the island’s GOP vote, which totaled a bit over 100,000, a much lower expectation than the estimated 300,000 that was previously predicted, as if there are 300,000 active Republicans living in Puerto Rico.)

Yet, if you asked Romney tonight, he sounded decisive and confident. He would tell you that yes, he has found the key to gaining the US Latino vote and moving it into the GOP column. Listen to this one from The New York Times:

“Those people who think Latinos won’t vote for a Republican need to talk to the people of Puerto Rico,” Mr. Romney said, speaking at an evening rally [in Illinois]. “I intend to get Latino voters to vote Republican and take back the White House.”

Yes, Romney is living in Macondo.

Here is why:

  • This entire GOP primary was critical for pro-statehood and Republican governor Luis Fortuño to bring the issue of the island’s political status into the limelight. Fortuño had publicly endorsed Romney and unlike other mainland governors, Fortuño worked hard the last few days, so much so that even his social media sites were all Romney all the time. The Friday night rally for Romney was classic Puerto Rican politics, where such an event would be seen as over the top on the mainland. Did Fortuño, who is very unpopular on the island and is facing an extremely tough re-election bid, achieve his goal? Sure thing. He got Romney the 20 delegates. Luis came through for Mitt. What will Mitt do for Luis in return?
  • How can the Romney campaign seriously put the Puerto Rican victory within the context of gaining more of the US Latino vote? First, Puerto Rico, even though it holds primaries, cannot participate in a national election for president. Second, add Fortuño’s establishment muscle (even though the turnout was low), Romney’s pledge to honor the island’s political status plebiscite if he were to become President, and most importantly, Rick Santorum’s English Only fail, and no wonder Romney won easily. Yet, if the Romney campaign is going to make this their “proof” that he can increase the US Latino vote, none of these primary votes from Puerto Rico wouldn’t even count. The campaign is painting the US Latino vote with a brush that couldn’t even produce a painting even if it painted itself with a paint by numbers set. Hence, Romney is living in Macondo.
  • Romney’s logic is flawed. Isn’t it safe to say that almost EVERYONE in Puerto Rico is of Latino origin? Hell, Romney could proudly proclaim the same thing about winning the key Guamanian vote as well, since he also took the GOP primary in Guam last week. Seems like Romney could be president of all US colonial territories. He’s winning those votes.
  • Romney played the “I love Puerto Rico” card to win the primary (because Santorum’s English Only comments just were disastrous to Puerto Rican voters), but we find it hard to believe that Romney will now be changing his stances on immigration, stopping his association with Anti-Immigration King Kris Kobach, and dropping his opposition to the Dream Act (which is highly popular with US Latino voters). We also doubt that even though Romney was telling Puerto Rican voters that it’s cool by him that they speak as much Spanish as they want, official English (a position he supports) be damned, Romney will wake up and realize that the US Latino is complex, diverse (how would Romney play in California in a national election?), and quite frankly, generally pissed at the GOP’s rhetoric. Does Romney now think that a primary that gets him 20 delegates and 20 delegates only will prove to the world that he can begin to chip away at the GOP’s dismally low approval ratings amongst US Latino voters?

The fact is simple: Fortuño worked the primary hard because having Romney in the White House would give Fortuño a better chance of putting a 51st star on the US flag. But this is no slam dunk for Fortuño, who might not even win his own election in November as the incumbent, nor is it one for Romney, who has become so desperate in “proving” that he can gain more than 14% of the US Latino vote, he would campaign in Macondo, where reality is an illusion and illusions only go so far.

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March Madness is a United States tradition that now borders on Super Bowl frenzy. According to USA Today, last year the total online and mobile viewership was 52 million viewers. This year, that number should be greater. Or will it?

Today, since we are HUGE March Madness fans (and Harvard is FINALLY in the tourney), signing up the online streaming site was a no-brainer. Last year, the site was free. However, this year is it $3.99 to catch all 67 games. The price point isn’t bad, it is actually pretty reasonable. But, and this is a big BUT, when we started the streaming site, we were greeted with ADS, ADS, and more ADS.

Click on game. You gotta wait. Watch these four ADS first. Want to switch to another game? Watch these ADS first.

It is annoying. It is getting us pissed and we think the NCAA and its broadcast networks are doing it all wrong. Our take, keep the ADS around the site’s skin and design, but if we have to wait 2 minutes before we see a live game, that will just bite.

One more gripe: you can’t switch to another game where there is an AD playing. BOO!!!!

Come on, NCAA, change it now, or else, people will stop watching.

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What is going on here? Has the Luis Fortuño love for Mitt Romney gone sour?

Really, Luis? That is how you treat a friend?

Just last month, the pro-statehood and Republican governor Fortuño traveled to Florida during the height of the Sunshine State’s GOP primary to endorse Mitt Romney. This week, with Republicans now campaigning in Puerto Rico for a March 18 primary (yes, in Puerto Rico, you can vote in primaries but you can’t vote in the national November elections), Fortuño held a meeting with Santorum today. Huh?

This is what happened today in San Juan at La Fortaleza, according to El Nuevo Día (original report is in Spanish, and we have provided a rough translation of the quotes), after Santorum met with Fortuño (press access was limited):

  • Santorum assured that he would support statehood for Puerto Rico if the Puerto Rican people chose that option in November’s plebiscite and he is elected President. “It is the responsibility of a U.S. President to hear the voice of all Americans, including the territories,” Santorum said. “Puerto Rico is a very important part of the United States and I will take the responsibility to represent all Americans.”
  • Santorum also talked about how he is good friends with Fortuño, since they both attended the same church in the Washington DC area. Santorum said that he was a key player in bringing Medicare to the island and that he has a good relationship with the current Resident Commissioner, Pedro Pierluisi (a Democrat) as well as Pedro Roselló, an ex-governor of Puerto Rico and a pro-statehooder.
  • When he was questioned about Fortuño’s endorsement of Romney, Santorum said that said many other governor have done the same. Santorum will visit several churches on the island and also meet with other pro-statehood leaders, including Jennifer González and Thomas Rivera Schatz.
  • END also confirmed that Romney will visit the island later this week and that Ron Paul and Newt Gingrich are considering visits.

Maybe Romney will have some words for Fortuño. Like, hey, dude, why you dissing me?

As for Santorum, his position is clear: you want to be a state, Puerto Rico? English has to be the primary language. Sorry.

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