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Posts Tagged ‘illegal immigration’


 

As Georgia debates Arizona-style anti-immigration bills that have led to demonstrations in Atlanta this week, a more curious story out of a Gwinnett Country Elementary School in Duluth brought the debate to the reading homework of a third-grade classroom.

The following video from Atlanta’s Channel 11 reports how Kelly Avalos discovered a worksheet entitled “What Is an Illegal Alien?” in her brother’s homework.

 

The worksheet, distributed by EdHelper.com, also contained the following multiple choice question:

What does the U.S. do with illegal aliens?

A. The U.S. puts them to work in the army.
B. The U.S. shoots them into outer space.
C. The U.S. puts them to death.
D. The U.S. sends them back where they came from.

Even though Gwinnett County is looking into the incident, Channel 11 did report the following: “Quintana said the teacher in question has only been teaching for a year. Ironically, the student’s family said the teacher is Hispanic.”

 

Web page of the Illegal Alien lesson developed by EdHelper.com

As for EdHelper.com, the actual Illegal Alien lesson can be found on this link, although you must be a paid subscriber to access the content. We did contact EdHelper tonight for a comment, and we will share once we hear back from them.

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Last week, while we learned of the death penalty sentence given to Minutemen leader and murderer Shawna Forde for the home invasion killing of two Latino American citizens, two Pennsylvania men convicted of severely beating an illegal Mexican immigrant in 2008 were sentenced last Wednesday to nine years in prison.

As reported by CBS News, the two men, Derrick Donchak and Brandon Piekarsky, were part of a group of white high school football players in Shenandoah, PA who attacked 25-year-old Luis Ramírez in 2008. Prosecutors in the case, which produced a conviction last October, claimed that the players beat Ramírez because of his ethnicity and because they didn’t want Ramírez living in their town. Ramírez eventually died from the injuries sustained in the brutal beating.

Luis Ramírez, beaten by white teenagers and eventually died from the injuries sustained

As CBS reports:

Justice Department prosecutor Myesha Braden said in court Wednesday that while Piekarsky, now 19, and Donchak, now 21, did not intend to kill Ramirez, they decided his ethnicity made him “somehow worthy of being beaten like a dog in the streets.”

Defense attorneys said they will appeal the verdicts and sentences.

The pair were convicted in October. They could have received more than 12 years to more than 15 years in prison under federal sentencing guidelines, but U.S. District Judge Richard Caputo granted them a reduction because of their personal character and conduct before Ramirez’s beating, as well as the numerous letters and testimonials he received.

He also noted Ramirez’s death and the crimes of Piekarsky and Donchak.

“The jury found that Mr. Ramirez died as a result of his ethnicity or race. This is serious business in America,” said Caputo, adding: “There are no winners here, only losers.”

Brandon Piekarsky, Copyright © The Associated Press

The report presents a good summary of the case, which garnered national attention last year:

Prosecutors and defense attorneys agreed that youth, testosterone and alcohol played a role. But they argued over the mindset of a quartet of belligerent teens who called Ramirez an ethnic slur, told him to go back to Mexico and assaulted the immigrant with their fists and feet.

Federal charges were brought against Piekarsky and Donchak after another all-white jury acquitted them of serious state crimes, including third-degree murder in Piekarsky’s case. Hispanic activists decried the May 2009 verdict, calling Ramirez’s death part of a rising tide of hate crimes against Latinos. They and Gov. Ed Rendell appealed for a Justice Department prosecution.

Piekarsky was accused of delivering a fatal kick to Ramirez’s head after he’d been knocked unconscious by another teen, Colin Walsh, who pleaded guilty in federal court and testified against his childhood friends. A fourth teen, Brian Scully, pleaded guilty in juvenile court and also testified for the prosecution.

Both defendants were convicted of a hate crime under the Fair Housing Act. Donchak also was convicted of two counts that he conspired with three Shenandoah police officers to cover up the crime. Those officers were tried last month in federal court on charges they obstructed a federal investigation into the fatal beating, but a jury rejected most of the government’s case.

Derrick Donchak, Copyright © The Associated Press

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As reported by Fox News Latino today, a new survey by the Pew Research Foundation released this past Monday provides a more analytic look at how American view immigration issues in the 21st century.  Here are some of the conclusions that the Pew survey, conducted Feb. 2-7 among 1,385 adults, reveals:

  • The idea of increased border security combined with a citizenship path to illegal immigrants already residing in the US is an option most Americans would support.
  • 57% of Americans oppose changing the Constitution for the sole purpose of denying automatic birthright citizenship of children of illegal immigrants born in the US.
  • 61% of Americans support Arizona’s controversial immigration law, which allows law enforcement officials to check the immigration status of individuals. However, according to the survey, 27% of Hispanics are in favor of the law,  as compared to 72% of Whites and 42% of Blacks. Support and opposition is also categorized by political affiliation as 54% of Democrats oppose the law while 88% of Republicans support it. 62% of Independents support the law and 34% disapprove of it.
  • The survey also called out what self-identified Tea Party members think. 57% of Tea Party members support a change to Constitution to eliminate birthright citizenship with 38% opposing a change.

On the Facebook page of Fox News Latino, fans of the page have already started to comment and share their thoughts about the FNL story and the survey. Here are just a few of the posts that appeared there tonight (Editor’s Note: we did not edit any of these comments):

People who’s birth took place in this nation are citizens and not “undocumented,” as stated by the constitution (addressing the first sentence). The issue with border “security” is that a lot of Conservative don’t see the line between patrolling the border (to return people to their nations of origin) v. building a wall at the border (to keep all others out). If we pass job creating legislation to identify and naturalize already resident immigrants, things should work out much better. More jobs, more money being paid into the government and more tax paying citizens.

I agree with tougher enforcement and a path to Residency before citizenship… And we need to crack hard on the drug stuff too

In other countries if atleast one of your parents is not a citizen of that country then the child is not a citenzen.. The only reason that amendment is in the constitution is because of the discrimination againts people brought here AGAINTS THEIR WILL.. Not otherwise specified. 🙂

Other parts of the survey focused on how Americans view jobs and illegal immigration. Below are all the infographics that Pew shared with their article:

This survey paints a different picture from the more extremist views dominating the conversation, both nationally and in Arizona. Maybe there is hope for America after all.

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Kansas state Representative Connie O'Brien

 

 

In response to public comments she made in a Federal and State Affairs Committee meeting in Topeka, Kansas, where she said that people with “that olive complexion” were illegal immigrants, Kansas state Rep. Connie O’Brien (R-Tonganoxie) apologized for her remarks. O’Brien was supporting the repeal of a Kansas law that allowed children of illegal immigrants in-state tuition to college.

As The Miami Herald reported:

Rep. Connie O’Brien, a Tonganoxie Republican, was speaking in favor of rescinding the law when she recounted a story about a student she saw while enrolling her son at Kansas City Kansas Community College last year.

The female student was in line to pick up scholarship money but couldn’t provide a driver’s license or other government ID to the clerk, O’Brien recalled. Yet the woman said she had driven to the college that day.

“We could tell by looking at her that she was not originally from this country,” O’Brien said.

Another lawmaker asked O’Brien how she could tell the woman wasn’t a legal citizen.

O’Brien replied: “Well, she wasn’t black, she wasn’t Asian and she had the olive complexion.”

O’Brien then continued: “It struck me that she didn’t have a driver’s license (and) she’s driving on our streets. That’s illegal.”

Even though O’Brien has begun to apologize for what she said, she still claims that the student in question was not a United States citizen. O’Brien has not presented any proof  to back up her claim.

I emailed O’Brien the following on February 16:

In light of your public comments about Latino immigrants, I am requesting a formal interview to discuss this story. Can you let me know if you would like to comment and talk with us? I am a Latino blogger who focuses on politics. Thank you! Julio Ricardo Varela

On February 17, O’Brien responded with this email to me:

Mr. Varela,

After contemplating the statements I made in the Federal and State Affairs Committee meeting, I understand how they could have been misconstrued. I misspoke and apologize to those I offended. I have learned from this situation and will be more careful with my choice of words in the future.

The student in question did not have a driver’s license, government identification or any other form of documentation. From the situation, it was clear that the student was not a United States citizen. However, I should have been more precise in stating why it was clear that she was not a legal citizen.

Thank you for the interview invitation. However, I have apologized and am moving forward.

Sincerely,

Connie

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