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Posts Tagged ‘LATISM’


VOTE TONIGHT: Fernando Varela and FORTE in America's Got Talent Semifinals

Let’s do this, people. Tonight. Tuesday, August 27. America’s Got Talent on NBC. Just click on the photo after 10:55 pm EST.

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Ok, it is official. My amazing brother Fernando Varela will be auditioning tonight at 9pm EST on NBC’s “America’s Got Talent” with FORTE.

NBCAGT

If this video clip is any indication of their audition, you can’t miss it!!!
You can follow FORTE on Facebook and on Twitter.

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This is what happens in life. People come in and out of it. Some of those people stay longer with you. And some of those people drift away, for whatever the reason. Yet you can never deny that some people who enter your life and then eventually leave it, still leave a lasting impact on you and make you a better person.

Such is the case of Louis Pagan. Louis was a friend. He died over the weekend at 41 years old. I am still in shock.

I got to know Louis in early 2009 via Twitter, when Twitter was cool. It was an exciting time for social media, especially for Latinos who were started to play in the space. From my interactions with him and with a small group of people who would eventually achieve great things, I saw a loving and giving person. Louis was the best. Louis was New York. Louis was an hermano.

The first time I met Louis in real life (I had already known him for months online), it was over a cup of coffee on a sunny spring East Side day in a Manhattan Starbucks. He shared with me his idea of creating an organization called Latinos in Social Media and even asked me if he thought the name LATISM resonated. No brainer, I told Louis, where do I sign up?

What Louis and others accomplished that year was phenomenal. LATISM was special, and it still is. Although I missed the first LATISM conference in New York, I was honored when Louis asked me to come down from Boston and speak at a LISTA conference later that year. The conference will always be one of the best ones I have ever spoken at because it was at a time when social media was still trying to figure itself out. It felt like the future, and it just proved to me that Louis was a visionary. It was also the first time I got to meet dear friends like Ana Roca Castro, Lili Gil, and Claudia Goffman. I also met the fabuloso Eduardo Gonzalez Loumiet there as well (who passed on the pics in this post to me). All these people are like family to me, and that was all Louis who made that happen.

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That night I also got to meet Louis’ wife, and I could instantly see a very loving and beautiful couple that cared for each other and their family. It pains me to think how she is feeling now, and I have no doubt that the Latino social media community will do all it can to help Louis’ family. It is the least we can do, for all that Louis did for us.

Even though that was the last time I ever saw Louis in person because we chose different paths (we still connected online), I will never forget those times. They were simpler, less complicated, full of promise and potential. Louis had a sparkle in his eye, and a passion that few can ever match.

Yes, he sparked a movement. A real authentic movement that is bigger than all of us. Without Louis’ idea, LATISM would never be here. Imagine that. I can’t.

Peace to you, hermano.

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It’s funny, but Louis’ last tweet says, “Beat that!” He was never one to brag about what he did or how many lives he touched, but yeah, “Beat that!” is perfect. Don’t think I can ever “Beat that!”, but with Louis as an inspiration, I will try as hard as I can. ABRAZOS, Louis.

 

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I knew the moment that I published a video challenging some in the Latino blogosphere to step up its game and be consistent in how we share and produce content when it comes to portrayals of Latinos on television, that I would catch some flak. I knew that my intentions and integrity would be questioned, and that some would see me as a divider and not as a uniter. I seriously thought this all out and the consequences it would bring, but in the end, I felt that I had to say something in public with the hope that we can all have a real dialogue about this.

I still stand by the fact that we do our community a disservice and mislead readers when we as bloggers participate in sponsored campaigns that speak to the “new, fresh” original programming for US Latinos when in fact we are just getting the same old, same old. (In this case, a cop show from Colombia, which leads into a show about a Colombian drug dealer. Five times a week. In primetime.) I also felt that we miss the point when we do solicited reviews that arise from a sponsored campaign and then all the reviews being published about MUNDO FOX’S “Corazones blindados” are highly positive. Who would have thought that every blog I have read from this sponsored campaign has been positive? I have yet to see one negative review. (If there is one, please post a link down here and let me know.)

What is interesting is that now I am getting criticisms for cutting down my colleagues and questioning their ethics. I have already been told that I  don’t have a clue because one blog in question has a clear disclosure policy and all their disclaimers are at the end of a post. I get told about FTC guidelines, not doing my research, and I also get called out for tearing the community down. I have also gotten a few private messages basically telling me that I was irresponsible and divisive. However, I am encouraged by the fact that I am getting more responses from people in private and some in public who have said that this issue should have been brought up. They key to all this is simple: agencies and bloggers can do all the sponsored campaigns they like, but please don’t rope along the community using a sponsored campaign that proudly proclaims that FINALLY something different is here on TV when in fact, it is just more of the same.

Yet, instead of having a real discussion about stereotypes in Latino media, I am now being called unprofessional for not telling the truth about the blogs and disclosure. I am now told that I messed up and that the sponsored posts are not compensated and that I missed the whole point about what a sponsored blog is.

Here is what is wrong about that specific criticism (and I am still waiting to hear about the bigger point being made about Latino stereotypes, which is the main point I made in the video): I still stand by the fact that many influential blogs in the Latino space are not being transparent enough about their disclosures. I also understand that people need to make a living by blogging. I am just suggesting that the disclosures need to go beyond a policy one someone’s page that quite frankly, no one reads anyway when they are reading a post.

Transparency starts with the blogger and the agency that promotes that blogger, and in the end, whenever I am in doubt, I alway ask myself: What would Chris Brogan do? Now, Chris is the first person to tell you that sponsored blogs and getting paid for your posts are good things. And he offers a great link for all bloggers to create their own disclosure policy (by the way, I don’t use a general disclosure policy on this personal blog because when I do, I try to disclose it up front on a post-by-post basis. The same goes for LatinoRebels.com)

However, because Chris is Chris and he always goes out his way to raise the bar, he is extremely clear when his posts are sponsored. For example, look at what he does in this case:

From this one example from Chris, what do we see?

  1. A clear “Sponsored Post” leading the blog title.
  2. A very strong and visible disclaimer that is in a larger font and clear. We know immediately, before we even begin to read the post, that is a post that a brand sponsored for Chris. He also says that his opinions are his own, 100%. In addition, the content of the post is his, original, and he is honest about the review. He also says that the brand suggested he write about certain features, but in the end, Chris just writes his own opinion and lets his review speak for himself.
  3. He goes beyond the FTC guidelines and doesn’t hide from the fact that he is doing a sponsored post.

What Chris does here is set a very simple and honest standard that all bloggers and agencies should aspire to. Instead of vague unclear statements at the end of a post (how many people read disclaimers at the end of a post anyway?), be up front and clear. Don’t assume that people will go click on another tab on your site and take the time to read your 300-word disclaimer policy. And also if you say you are part of a sponsored campaign, explain that before you get into writing your review, and be ready to answer the questions as to why most of the posts in the sponsored campaign are very similar in intent and scope. Learning about the fact after reading a sponsored post you didn’t know was sponsored to begin with only leads to disappointment for your readers and raises ethical issues that may or may not be accurate in your mind, but they still raise questions. Then explaining via comments and messages after the fact only begs the question: why weren’t you up front with it at the post level at the very beginning of the post and follow an example like the one Chris did?

Other questions I think that bloggers should consider regarding sponsored posts:

  • Is this something I really want to promote to my readers? If so, how do I find the right balance between writing for or about a brand and not sacrificing the relationship I have with my readers?
  • What is the intent of the brand or agency? Is their goal just to get the word out to take advantage of what you have worked so hard to build, or are they really sincere in promoting you as well? This relationship is a two-way street, and brands are no longer bigger or better than the blogosphere. They are equals, and will they treat you as such? The most successful campaigns I have been involved with have always allowed the blogger to be independent from what the brand would like you to write about, and yet these same brands have also promoted the blog posts on their own networks and pages. That type of arrangement becomes a true two-way relationship.
  • Do you want to monetize your blog and is working with a brand the best way to go? Have you thought of other ideas, like creating your own products (like t-shirts, books, etc.) or starting your own commerce site of your favorite things where you can become an affiliate and earn a commission? Why do you think you need brands? Seriously ask yourself that question, and be honest with your answer. If you want to write for brands on your personal blog and get compensated for it, then it leads to 100% transparency every time you write about a brand, even when you tweet or share your links to social networks.
  • Why is the benefit to you of establishing a sponsored relationship? Do you need brands to help your blog get more readers or do you want to make a living from blogging? If you do, ask yourself, “What would Chris Brogan do?” That is always a great place to start, because Chris is all about complete transparency.

So I hope this at least gets a real discussion going and allows for more opinions and thoughts to be shared. As for me, I can say the following without hesitation: I have no issue with sponsored posts or campaigns if they are done authentically and with the right intentions. For me, promoting a new Spanish-language channel whose primetime weekly lineup is all about cops, criminals, and drug lords and saying that it is programming worth watching for US Latinos is wrong. Influential blogs need to know that many people are watching and reading them, and this is still a very small and connected community. I know many others feel the same way as I do, and if my mistake was sharing my opinions about what I find to be a misleading practice and not good for the overall representation of the US Latino market, then I will make that same mistake again.

I really hope that we begin to discuss what I feel is a big issue in the Latino blogosphere about sponsored campaigns. As leaders who have been there from the very beginning, promoting a brand that has done little (so far) to advance the portrayal of US Latinos in mainstream media just doesn’t cut it for me. That is not being divisive. It’s just expressing my opinion and wishing that we as a community are more united in our demands for more quality content from mainstream networks.

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Ok, hopefully by now, I don’t have to explain much about this little experiment that started in March. But just in case, you can read about the background here. Let’s just get into it. 

Who, among a sample of a few pages, is the most engaging Latino Facebook Page at the beginning of October? Let’s see below. Anything above 15% is really strong. Anything above 40% is outstanding. Anything above 40% is beyond ridiculous and on another level.

Ok, here is the October list (numbers based on page checks on October 1, 2012 from 10:30 am-11:15 am EST; full disclosure: Latino Rebels is my organization. Also, this is just a data capture from a limited time window. We know that the “people talking about this” feature can fluctuate. This is not an exact science, but it does prove that having a highly engaged community will always benefit your brand, organization, group, etc.)

October’s Sampling of Latino Facebook Pages and Their Facebook Level of Engagement (FLOE)

  1. One Voice Radio: 412% (1,106 likes · 4,554 talking about this)
  2. Rico Puerto Rico: 266% (33,984 likes · 90,375 talking about this)
  3. Cultura: 158% (818 likes · 1,293 talking about this)
  4. Latino Rebels: 57.1% (21,739 likes · 12,213 talking about this)
  5. NBC Latino: 56.3% (18,394 likes · 10,667 talking about this)
  6. Fit Latina: 52.4% (1,504 likes · 787 talking about this)
  7. National Hispanic Foundation for the Arts: 48.5% (1,970 likes · 956 talking about this)
  8. Pa’lante Latino: 40% (1,875 likes · 750 talking about this)
  9. Presente.org: 39.7% (10,514 likes · 4,175 talking about this)
  10. So Mexican: 28.5% (1,592,875 likes · 454,152 talking about this)
  11. Pocho.com: 26.5% (2,540 likes · 648 talking about this)
  12. Es el momento: 26.3% (12,889 likes · 3,386 talking about this)
  13. VOXXI: 25.9% (9,673 likes · 2,505 talking about this)
  14. Cuéntame: 24.3% (85,763 likes · 20,850 talking about this)
  15. SoLatina: 23.5% (62,533 likes · 14,701 talking about this)
  16. Sofrito for Your Soul: 23% (9,425 likes · 2,172 talking about this)
  17. Voto Latino: 17.4% (50,834 likes · 8,848 talking about this)
  18. Despierta América: 16.8% (129,883 likes · 21,860 talking about this)
  19. SpanglishBaby: 16.7% (6,596 likes · 1,104 talking about this)
  20. Latino Justice: 14.3% (2,574 likes · 368 talking about this)
  21. Being Puerto Rican: 13.6% (21,642 likes · 2,948 talking about this)
  22. Think Mexican: 13.4% (5,322 likes · 717 talking about this)
  23. El Diario NY: 11.2% (7,398 likes · 826 talking about this)
  24. Disney World Latino: 11% (91,755 likes · 10,102 talking about this)
  25. Latina Bloggers Connect: 10.5% (1,953 likes · 205 talking about this)
  26. Primer impacto: 10.2% (239,953 likes · 24,566 talking about this)
  27. Gozamos: 9.3% (4,388 likes · 409 talking about this)
  28. HuffPost Latino Voices: 9.1% (8,054 likes · 736 talking about this)
  29. Being Latino: 8.4% (78,329 likes · 6,569 talking about this)
  30. Latina Mom Bloggers: 8.3% (1,368 likes · 114 talking about this)
  31. Remezcla: 8.2% (11,654 likes · 959 talking about this)
  32. Hispanically Speaking News: 7.5% (3,069 likes · 229 talking about this)
  33. People en español: 7.1% (180,811 likes · 12,583 talking about this)
  34. Los Pichy Boys: 7.1% (14,583 likes · 1,036 talking about this)
  35. Hispanicize: 7% (4,936 likes · 345 talking about this)
  36. Cosmo for Latinas: 7% (8,995 likes · 627 talking about this)
  37. Proud to Be Latina: 6.7% (1,702 likes · 114 talking about this)
  38. Univision: 6.5% (573,589 likes · 37,383 talking about this)
  39. CNN en español: 6.3% (1,167,362 likes · 73,297 talking about this)
  40. The Big Tino: 5.8% (62,847 likes · 3,629 talking about this)
  41. Calle 13: 5.2% (1,366,776 likes · 71,570 talking about this)
  42. Mayo Clinic (Español): 5% (1,911 likes · 95 talking about this)
  43. Ford en español: 4.8% (1,764 likes · 85 talking about this)
  44. Telemundo: 4.4% (341,016 likes · 14,849 talking about this)
  45. National Council of La Raza: 4.3% (20,089 likes · 871 talking about this)
  46. Latina List: 3.7% (3,037 likes · 111 talking about this)
  47. Pitbull: 3.6% (23,697,661 likes · 860,310 talking about this)
  48. Mun2: 3.6% (235,965 likes · 8,581 talking about this)
  49. Ask a Mexican: 3.3% (36,955 likes · 1,202 talking about this)
  50. Univision News: 3% (7,133 likes · 214 talking about this)
  51. News Taco: 3% (4,313 likes · 128 talking about this)
  52. Mamiverse: 2.9% (19,106 likes · 560 talking about this)
  53. La Cosmopolitana: 2.8% (1,331 likes · 37 talking about this)
  54. Mexican Word of the Day: 2.7% (1,310,759 likes · 35,909 talking about this)
  55. Vitera: 2.4% (4,564 likes · 108 talking about this)
  56. Somos Verizon Fios: 2.3% (45,952 likes · 1,052 talking about this)
  57. Latina: 2.1% (72,971 likes · 1,500 talking about this)
  58. Fox News Latino: 2.1% (67,728 likes · 1,443 talking about this)
  59. New Latina: 2.1% (4,498 likes · 96 talking about this)
  60. Immigrant Archive Project: 2% (12,138 likes · 247 talking about this)
  61. Papi Blogger: 1.6% (825 likes · 13 talking about this)
  62. El Gordo y la Flaca: 1.2% (319,364 likes · 3,849 talking about this)
  63. American Latino Museum: 1.1% (121,169 likes · 1,279 talking about this)
  64. Latinos in Social Media: .09% (143,490 likes · 1,249 talking about this)
  65. Selena Gómez: .08% (33,732,351 likes · 280,406 talking about this)
  66. Shakira:  .07% (54,626,349 likes · 368,018 talking about this)
  67. Toyota Latino: .06% (75,201 likes · 414 talking about this)
  68. Mi Casa Broadcasting: .06% (3,868 likes · 26 talking about this)

If you would like me to add your page to this list, just let me know with a comment to this blog.

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It is August 1 and it’s time for another review of Latino-themed Facebook pages and their Facebook Level of Engagement (FLOE). Like we have said in the past:

Our intent was to offer a sampling of the thousands of Latino-themed Facebook pages out there. The list was no way near exhaustive, if you are a page that would like to be added to the list, just post your link below in the comments section and add it. Before we share the latest list, just a quick reminder that this is all about engagement. The goal is to ensure that you achieve the maximum results in the number of likes that you have on a consistent basis, since the more people are talking about you, the better your chances are at establishing real relationships and getting more interest in your online content and properties.

Let’s first check in with the Facebook page of George Takei, the KING OF FACEBOOK. His latest numbers as of this morning: 2,359,514 likes · 2,838,184 talking about this (that is a 120% FLOE, another outstanding month for the Facebook Page King).

Like we say every month, many pages have a lot of likes, but imagine if you are one of those pages and you can push your FLOE over 15%? 20%? 30%? These FLOE percentages are all based on real-time stats taken this morning, August 1. We also decided to make one master list, and encourage other brands and organizations to pass on their Facebook links to us so we can add you to the future lists. Why are we doing this? Here are our reasons:

  1. We want to start curating a master list of Latino-themed Facebook pages.
  2. We want to see if all these pages can achieve a consistent FLOE of 15%. Once that happens, imagine the possibilities.
  3. Don’t just work to get the numbers, once you have the numbers, curate content that will have people talking about your page. With greater numbers, you have a greater chance of engaging people and having people sharing your content on Facebook organically.
  4. We decided to keep some of the bigger Latino celebrity pages since a few agencies asked us to do this. It is exciting to see that such pages has millions and millions of likes, but the fact remains: all those pages are under-performing in terms of engagement rates. Just look at George Takei’s page. He has 2 million likes and his engagement rate is off the charts. Celebrity pages just don’t get it. FOLLOW TAKEI’S MODEL!

Ok, here is the August list (numbers based on page checks on August 1, 2012 from 8am-9am EST; full disclosure: Latino Rebels is my organization.)  It is very important to note that Facebook can be fickle. For example, a page might all of a sudden have 10,000 people talking about it, but then it dips down to 6,000 again.

Nonetheless, we are just trying to capture a moment in the monthly life of a Facebook page. This is not a definitive data study, since they only way to capture that is to have pages actually submit the real hard admin data.

And like we said, Facebook is just one part of your strategy, it is not THE strategy. The key is always about your main content hub and how a place like Facebook can get you more engaged followers and loyalists.

August’s Sampling of Latino Facebook Pages and Their Facebook Level of Engagement (FLOE)

  1. One Voice Radio: 579% (643 likes · 3,726 talking about this)
  2. Pa’lante Latino: 242.9% (1,556 likes · 3,779 talking about this)
  3. Latino Rebels: 117% (17,802 likes · 20,857 talking about this)
  4. Being Puerto Rican: 99.5% (20,187 likes · 20,087 talking about this)
  5. Fit Latina: 89% (1,085 likes · 966 talking about this)
  6. Sofrito for Your Soul: 86.9% (8,929 likes · 7,757 talking about this)
  7. NBC Latino: 69.5% (4,337 likes · 3,013 talking about this)
  8. So Mexican: 62.5% (1,060,690 likes · 663,451 talking about this)
  9. Voto Latino: 47.6% (32,613 likes · 15,515 talking about this)
  10. SoLatina: 47% (60,144 likes · 28,279 talking about this)
  11. Pocho.com: 35.7% (1,874 likes · 668 talking about this)
  12. VOXXI: 30.7% (3,286 likes · 1,010 talking about this)
  13. Being Latino: 25.3% (76,136 likes · 19,319 talking about this)
  14. Presente.org: 23.8%(9,607 likes · 2,286 talking about this)
  15. Think Mexican: 22.9% (4,975 likes · 1,138 talking about this)
  16. The Big Tino: 22.8% (72,734 likes · 16,596 talking about this)
  17. Remezcla: 16.8% (10,756 likes · 1,804 talking about this)
  18. Gozamos: 16.3% (4,084 likes · 668 talking about this)
  19. Cuéntame: 13.7% (81,045 likes · 11,090 talking about this)
  20. Primer impacto: 12.6% (200,362 likes · 23,538 talking about this)
  21. Mamiverse: 11.7% (18,959 likes · 2,225 talking about this)
  22. HuffPost Latino Voices: 11.4% (7,041 likes · 806 talking about this)
  23. National Hispanic Foundation for the Arts: 11.4% (1,397 likes · 159 talking about this)
  24. Disney World Latino: 10.5% (61,215 likes · 6,452 talking about this)
  25. News Taco: 10.2% (4,245 likes · 434 talking about this)
  26. Univision News: 8.8% (5,992 likes · 526 talking about this)
  27. Mexican Word of the Day: 8.2% (1,316,494 likes · 107,597 talking about this)
  28. Cosmo for Latinas: 8.2% (7,691 likes · 627 talking about this)
  29. Telemundo: 7.3% (316,198 likes · 23,141 talking about this)
  30. Somos Verizon Fios: 7.1% (37,941 likes · 2,671 talking about this)
  31. SpanglishBaby: 6.8% (5,514 likes · 374 talking about this)
  32. El Diario NY: 6.4% (4,632 likes · 297 talking about this)
  33. Latina: 5.8% (68,198 likes · 4,017 talking about this)
  34. El Gordo y la Flaca: 5.6% (305,426 likes · 17,165 talking about this)
  35. Fox News Latino: 5.5% (64,717 likes · 3,575 talking about this)
  36. Los Pichy Boys: 5.5% (13,623 likes · 747 talking about this)
  37. Mayo Clinic (Español): 5.5% (1,245 likes · 69 talking about this)
  38. American Latino Museum: 4.9% (120,054 likes · 5,902 talking about this)
  39. Mi Casa Broadcasting: 4.9% (4,175 likes · 204 talking about this)
  40. Pitbull: 4.5% (22,220,230 likes · 1,007,836 talking about this)
  41. Immigrant Archive Project: 4.5% (11,961 likes · 534 talking about this)
  42. Mun2: 4.2% (208,904 likes · 8,748 talking about this)
  43. Hispanicize: 3.9% (4,535 likes · 179 talking about this)
  44. Despierta América: 3.7% (107,651 likes · 4,019 talking about this)
  45. National Council of La Raza: 3.6% (19,055 likes · 694 talking about this)
  46. Es el momento: 3.5% (11,827 likes · 408 talking about this)
  47. La Cosmopolitana: 3.5% (1,265 likes · 44 talking about this)
  48. Vitera: 3.3% (4,562 likes · 153 talking about this)
  49. Latina List: 3.3% (2,953 likes · 99 talking about this)
  50. Ask a Mexican: 3.2% (35,814 likes · 1,134 talking about this)
  51. Selena Gómez: 2.5% (32,790,414 likes · 832,399 talking about this)
  52. Calle 13: 2.8% (1,230,262 likes · 34,089 talking about this)
  53. Ford en español: 2.8% (1,617 likes · 46 talking about this)
  54. Hispanically Speaking News: 2.4% (2,974 likes · 71 talking about this)
  55. People en español: 2.3% (169,655 likes · 3,948 talking about this)
  56. Shakira:  0.06% (53,403,436 likes · 327,447 talking about this)
  57. Cristiano Ronaldo: 0.006% (47,330,743 likes · 296,751 talking about this)
  58. Toyota Latino: 0.005% (74,493 likes · 413 talking about this)
  59. Latinos in Social Media: .001% (139,888 likes · 177 talking about this)

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It is July 1 and it’s time for another review of Latino-themed Facebook pages and their Facebook Level of Engagement (FLOE). Like we said last month:

Our intent was to offer a sampling of the thousands of Latino-themed Facebook pages out there. The list was no way near exhaustive, if you are a page that would like to be added to the list, just post your link below in the comments section and add it. Before we share the latest list, just a quick reminder that this is all about engagement. The goal is to ensure that you achieve the maximum results in the number of likes that you have on a consistent basis, since the more people are talking about you, the better your chances are at establishing real relationships and getting more interest in your online content and properties.

Let’s first check in with the Facebook page of George Takei, the KING OF FACEBOOK. His latest numbers as of this morning: 2,171,810 likes · 2,304,737 talking about this (that is a 106.1% FLOE, another outstanding month for the Facebook Page King).

Like we say every month, many pages have a lot of likes, but imagine if you are one of those pages and you can push your FLOE over 15%? 20%? 30%? These FLOE percentages are all based on real-time stats taken this morning, July 1. We also decided to make one master list, and encourage other brands and organizations to pass on their Facebook links to us so we can add you to the July list. Why are we doing this? Here are our reasons:

  1. We want to start curating a master list of Latino-themed Facebook pages.
  2. We want to see if all these pages can achieve a consistent FLOE of 15%. Once that happens, imagine the possibilities.
  3. Don’t just work to get the numbers, once you have the numbers, curate content that will have people talking about your page. With greater numbers, you have a greater chance of engaging people and having people sharing your content on Facebook organically.
  4. We decided to keep some of the bigger Latino celebrity pages since a few agencies asked us to do this. It is exciting to see that such pages has millions and millions of likes, but the fact remains: all those pages are under-performing in terms of engagement rates. Just look at George Takei’s page. He has 2 million likes and his engagement rate is off the charts. Celebrity pages just don’t get it. FOLLOW TAKEI’S MODEL!

Ok, here is the July list (numbers based on page checks on July 1, 2012 from 9am-11am EST; full disclosure: Latino Rebels is my organization.)  It is very important to note that Facebook can be fickle. For example, a page might all of a sudden have 10,000 people talking about it, but then it dips down to 6,000 again.

Nonetheless, we are just trying to capture a moment in the monthly life of a Facebook page. This is not a definitive data study, since they only way to capture that is to have pages actually submit the real hard admin data.

And like we said, Facebook is just one part of your strategy, it is not THE strategy. The key is always about your main content hub and how a place like Facebook can get you more engaged followers and loyalists.

A huge shout out to the Facebook page of SO MEXICAN, which had over 500,000 people talking about its page. And Pitbull’s page finally showed some increase in engagement with over 20 million fans.

July’s Sampling of Latino Facebook Pages and Their Facebook Level of Engagement (FLOE)

  1. Latino Rebels: 143% (16,210 likes · 23,179 talking about this)
  2. Fit Latina: 73.1% (841 likes · 615 talking about this)
  3. So Mexican: 56.2% (907,026 likes · 509,900 talking about this)
  4. Pocho.com: 35.1% (1,624 likes · 571 talking about this)
  5. Voto Latino: 32.2% (17,369 likes · 5,598 talking about this)
  6. VOXXI: 30.0% (1,516 likes · 456 talking about this)
  7. Being Latino: 26.1% (74,698 likes · 19,583 talking about this)
  8. Mamiverse: 25.7% (18,744 likes · 4,826 talking about this)
  9. NBC Latino: 22.3% (3,151 likes · 703 talking about this)
  10. Sofrito for Your Soul: 20.6% (8,084 likes · 1,669 talking about this)
  11. The Big Tino: 20.3% (72,371 likes · 14,733 talking about this)
  12. Gozamos: 19.2% (3,866 likes · 743 talking about this)
  13. SoLatina: 18.7% (59,220 likes · 11,105 talking about this)
  14. Remezcla: 17.4% (10,459 likes · 1,819 talking about this)
  15. El Diario NY: 15.5% (4,430 likes · 688 talking about this)
  16. Fox News Latino: 15.3% (63,068 likes · 9,620 talking about this)
  17. Despierta América: 11.7% (102,266 likes · 11,975 talking about this)
  18. Ford en español: 10.4% (1,542 likes · 161 talking about this)
  19. Primer impacto: 10% (187,400 likes · 18,741 talking about this)
  20. Pa’lante Latino: 9.7% (1,347 likes · 132 talking about this)
  21. Cuéntame: 9.5% (80,108 likes · 7,616 talking about this)
  22. Telemundo: 9.1% (298,590 likes · 27,048 talking about this)
  23. HuffPost Latino Voices: 8.7% (6,515 likes · 568 talking about this)
  24. Latina: 7.7% (65,506 likes · 5,053 talking about this)
  25. Disney World Latino: 8.1% (49,467 likes · 4,032 talking about this)
  26. National Council of La Raza: 7.8% (18,538 likes · 1,438 talking about this)
  27. Being Puerto Rican: 7.5% (19,029 likes · 1,435 talking about this)
  28. SpanglishBaby: 6.7% (5,175 likes · 347 talking about this)
  29. Mexican Word of the Day: 6.3% (1,308,727 likes · 82,767 talking about this)
  30. Latina List: 5.8% (2,908 likes · 169 talking about this)
  31. Pitbull: 5.7% (21,347,089 likes · 1,222,217 talking about this)
  32. Univision News: 5.7% (5,466 likes · 309 talking about this)
  33. American Latino Museum: 5.5% (118,758 likes · 6,488 talking about this)
  34. Los Pichy Boys: 5.5% (12,956 likes · 708 talking about this)
  35. National Hispanic Foundation for the Arts: 5.4% (1,368 likes · 74 talking about this)
  36. Cosmo for Latinas: 4.8% (6,543 likes · 314 talking about this)
  37. Vitera: 4.7% (4,508 likes · 215 talking about this)
  38. Mun2: 4.6% (197,707 likes · 9,031 talking about this)
  39. News Taco: 3.9% (4,160 likes · 164 talking about this)
  40. Immigrant Archive Project: 3.7% (11,842 likes · 441 talking about this)
  41. Calle 13: 3.3% (1,203,360 likes · 40,058 talking about this)
  42. Es el momento: 3.3% (11,297 likes · 375 talking about this)
  43. Think Mexican: 3.1% (4,732 likes · 148 talking about this)
  44. People en español: 2.7% (162,232 likes · 4,420 talking about this)
  45. Hispanicize: 2.7% (4,404 likes · 119 talking about this)
  46. Ask a Mexican: 2.5% (35,205 likes · 887 talking about this)
  47. Hispanically Speaking News: 2.5% (2,913 likes · 74 talking about this)
  48. Cristiano Ronaldo: 2.5% (46,139,838 likes · 1,175,161 talking about this)
  49. Somos Verizon Fios: 1% (34,378 likes · 338 talking about this)
  50. Selena Gómez: 1.4% (31,855,530 likes · 431,576 talking about this)
  51. La Cosmopolitana: 1% (1,250 likes · 22 talking about this)
  52. Shakira:  0.09% (52,251,465 likes · 468,098 talking about this)
  53. El Gordo y la Flaca: 0.08% (297,843 likes · 2,469 talking about this)
  54. Toyota Latino: 0.006% (73,980 likes · 463 talking about this)
  55. Latinos in Social Media: .002% (139,118 likes · 239 talking about this)

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