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Just two days after Governor Luis Fortuño announced new amendments to Puerto Rico’s vote on its political status, the Puerto Rican Senate approved the changes for plebiscite, which will be held on the island next August.

The plebiscite, which will once again try to check the mood of the island regarding its colonial relationship with the United States, will now be held in one step, instead of the two-step proposal that was originally pushed by Fortuño earlier this year.

As reported today by Prensa Latina:

San Juan, Dec 21 (Prensa Latina) After days of wrangling and disagreements in the leadership of the ruling New Progressive Party (PNP), the Senate in Puerto Rico approved the legislative measure to carry out a plebiscite to define the future status of the island with the United States.

Governor Luis G. Fortuño persuaded the presidents of the legislative chambers to approve the project to consult the people on relations with Washington, which maintains colonial rule in the country since the military invasion in 1898.

Jenniffer Gonzalez, president of the House of Representatives had always supported that the bill be voted on in accordance with the wishes of the Puerto Rican governor, which was ratified after a meeting at La Fortaleza, government house.

However, Senate president Thomas Rivera Schatz voted for the measure despite rejecting the changes introduced by Fortuño to allow the consultation to be made on Nov. 6, 2012, the same day of the general elections.

Neither did the leader of the Senate agree to eliminate the colonial word referring to the “Free Associated State” created by Washington in 1952 to remove Puerto Rico from the United Nations register of those countries under colonial rule.

Originally, the status consultation was scheduled to take place in two stages, in August and November 2012, for the people to decide in the first round if they wanted to continue as a colony of the United States and in the second, to say what status would they prefer: annexation, free association or independence.

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