Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Puerto Rican politics’


Good to see Florida Senator Marco Rubio commenting about the upcoming November plebiscite question in Puerto Rico. Sure, Rubio, who is of Cuban American descent, represents the state of Florida, which has seen an increase in voters of Puerto Rican descent the last few years, so it makes sense that he would weigh on the island’s non-binding vote to determine its political identity (statehood, independence or enhanced commonwealth). However, Rubio’s opinion reflects what most of the US Congress and President Obama is saying: the final decision by Puerto Ricans on the island has to be a clear majority, whatever that means. Just for reference, the 1958 statehood vote by Alaska won by a 6 to 1 margin, although only about 46,000 voted in Alaska. In 1959, Hawaii gained a 94% voted for statehood. Ironically, the one person who is pushing for a binding resolution of the status question is GOP front-runner Mitt Romney.

This is what a report from Caribbean Business chronicled about Rubio’s comments:

Florida Sen. Marco Rubio, a rising star in the Republican Party and potential vice presidential pick, has broken ranks with GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney over the issue off Puerto Rico statehood.

Rubio said in an interview that 50 percent plus one vote in a status plebiscite isn’t enough to put Puerto Rico on the path to become the 51st state.

“It doesn’t have to be 100 percent, nor 90 percent, but it cannot be, to say a figure, 51 percent of the votes,” Rubio reportedly told a local newspaper.

That puts the Cuban-American lawmaker, often mentioned as a vice presidential running mate for Romney, at odds with the former Massachusetts governor on statehood.

Romney has pledged to support statehood for the island if that option wins the Nov. 6 referendum on Puerto Rico’s political status, saying a simple majority at the polls should be enough.

The position taken by Rubio, a Tea Party favorite, actually puts him on the same page as Democratic President Barack Obama when it comes to statehood for Puerto Rico.

Right now, polls on the island show a virtual dead heat between enhanced commonwealth and statehood. It is highly doubtful that either option enters Hawaii or Alaska numbers, and in the end, the US Congress will still have final say. So, after 114 years of a complex (and colonial) relationship with the United States, Puerto Rico looks like it will still be stuck in the status quo.

One thing all Puerto Ricans, both on the island and the mainland, should agree on is that the upcoming plebiscite needs to be BINDING.

If you agree, let your elected officials know by visiting their official Congressional pages.

Read Full Post »


PRESS RELEASE
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Luis A. Delgado Rodriguez, tel. 787-306-4376

The organization Alliance for a Sovereign Free Association (ALAS) of Puerto Rico officially launched the candidacy of attorney and former Puerto Rican Senator José Alfredo (Yeyo) Ortiz Daliot for the still-vacant position of Resident Commissioner of the Popular Democratic Party (PPD), noting that this would be the best way to resolve this nomination.

The organization’s president, Prof. Luis A. Delgado Rodriguez, said Ortiz Daliot  is the ideal person for this application because when compared to other candidates, Ortiz Daliot has the best attributes to fill that position. Ortiz Daliot has the qualifications: he has remained a faithful member of the PPD, as a San Juan delegate in the party’s last General Assembly; he was director of the Puerto Rican Federal Affairs Office (PRAFA) for five years; and he knows and has extensive experience in the dynamic world of Washington, being recognized and respected by all federal members of the Republican and Democratic parties. Ortiz Daliot  is also known in the White House, having actively participated in the development of the latest work of the White House’s Task Force on Puerto Rico’s status question.

The nomination of Ortiz Daliot for Resident Commissioner was announced on Monday October 24 on a radio show and immediately received broad support from the radio audience and the “New Majority,” the term that being used in Puerto Rico to identify people who support and favor free association.

The ALAS president said that the nomination of Ortiz Daliot  would give the President of the PPD three advantages: first, he would balance the ticket to include a candidate of the New Majority. Second, he would bridge important sectors of the center-left, liberal, autonomous and sovereign sectors of the PPD. In addition, based on Monday’s support , his candidacy would transcend the limits of the Popular Party and receive broad support from all the political sectors of the country.

Faced with this possibility, Ortiz Daliot said on Monday that he would be willing to consider such a nomination if PPD gubernatorial Alejandro García Padilla would support it.

“The end goal is to have the best and most qualified candidate for Resident Commissioner. In this case, we are offering a solution to this problem. Now the [PPD leadership] has the floor.” Ortiz Daliot said.

UPDATE (October 26, 2011): García Padilla has chosen Rafael Cox Alomar to be his candidate.

Read Full Post »

%d bloggers like this: