Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘status’


Even with the historic White House Report on Puerto Rican status published this year, a new social media movement is gathering steam on the island of Puerto Rico on the heels of a June 14 visit by President Barack Obama.

Inspired by recent movements in both the Middle East and in Spain, residents of the Western Hemisphere’s oldest colony (a territory of the United States since the Spanish-American War of 1898) will gather in the streets demanding for political justice. President Obama, who had promised during his 2008 campaign bid that Puerto Rico’s paradoxical political status would be a top priority for his Administration, has nonetheless issued a White House Report that has failed to fulfill his promise. The report, which has been widely touted by the Republican, pro-statehood and Fox News media darling Governor Luis Fortuño, has been criticized by many for its leaning towards a more pro-statehood movement. It is clear that the current political climate of the United States (Arizona, immigration, anti-Latino hate, Republican refusal of Puerto Rico becoming the 51st state) will not result in a statehood solution. Any plebiscites held on the island (and Fortuño is proposing phase 1 in late 2011 and phase 2 in 2013) will ne non-binding and still be decided and determined by the US Congress.

The time to stop depending on the United States and the island’s current political system is NOW. Join the cause on June 14, either by attending the rally or by supporting it through social media.

Read Full Post »


20110520-114615.jpg

As reported in Spanish by EL Nuevo Día, Puerto Rico’s largest newspaper, the lawsuit submitted in 2006 against the United States government by former pro-statehood Governor Pedro Rosselló to the Organization of American States (OAS) is still in at a preliminary stage with the OAS’ investigative commission.

Rosselló argued before the OAS commission that the residents of Puerto Rico do not have the right to vote for U.S. president or have a full-fledged representation in Congress, and that the US federal government violates the human and civil rights to the 3.7 million residents of the island.

The United States, responding to Rosselló’s suit, said through its OAS representative, said that the residents of Puerto Rico have “repeatedly” supported the current Commonwealth status through several plebiscites.

“The results of these status votes have not expressed a preference for statehood, the status which will give [Puerto Ricans] the federal right to vote,” said Milton Drucker, deputy US representative to the OAS.

For the popular representative Jorge Colberg Toro the position taken by Drucker represented a “face mask” to the PNP.

But, the resident commissioner in Washington, Pedro Pierluisi, chosen by the pro-statehood new Progressive Party (PNP) disagreed.

“Nothing is going to have more weight in our struggle that the vote of a majority of American citizens residing in Puerto Rico for statehood. It’s time to assume our own responsibility, “said Pierluisi.

According to chief executive of the Puerto Rican Independence Party (PIP), Fernando Martín, the position at the OAS is a reaffirmation that the United States recognizes its responsibility to decolonization.

Read Full Post »


With the announcement of a Dialogue Committee by Puerto Rico’s Republican and pro-statehood leader Luis Fortuño that has attempted to bring consensus to the colony’s upcoming plebiscite on political status, several organizations, particularly those who support a “free associated state,” have been prohibited from participating in Fortuño’s committee.

As a result, these organizations have decided to take the matter into their own hands and hold their own forums about why Fortuño has not allowed them into the conversation.

ANUNCIO EN ESPAÑOL

La organización Alianza pro Libre Asociación Soberana (ALAS) se une a los compañeros de Acción Democrática Puertorriqueña (ADP) en el coauspicio de la siguiente actividad:

CONFERENCIA Y CONVERSATORIO

EL VOTO DE LOS PUERTORRIQUEÑOS AUSENTES EN EL PROCESO DE LIBRE DETERMINACIÓN DE PUERTO RICO

Conferenciante:   Lcdo.  Manuel Rivera

Sábado 7 de mayo de 2011 a las 2:30 PM

ATENEO PUERTORRIQUEÑO

SAN JUAN

Este tema es de gran interés para los miembros de ALAS, ya que ese derecho para los puertorriqueños es uno de los requisitos que estaremos solicitando en la implantación de la ley habilitadora del plebiscito de estatus si finalmente se realizara.

Por estas razones invitamos a todos los simpatizantes de ALAS y colaboradores nos demos cita para acompañar a nuestros hermanos de ADP en la actividad del próximo sábado 7 en el Ateneo Puertorriqueño en San Juan.

“Recordando siempre, que lo que necesitamos es voluntad para dar un primer paso”

ENGLISH ANNOUNCEMENT

The organization of the Alliance for an Associated Free State (ALAS) joins fellow organization Puerto Rican Democratic Action (PDA) in the co-sponsorship of the following activity:

CONFERENCES AND FORUMS

THE ABSENT VOTES OF PUERTO RICANS IN THE SELF-DETERMINATION PROCESS FOR PUERTO RICO

Speaker: Atty. Manuel Rivera

Saturday May 7, 2011 at 2:30 PM

ATENEO PUERTORRIQUEÑO

SAN JUAN

This issue is of great interest to members of ALAS. This right for Puerto Ricans is one of the requirements that we request in the implementation of the status plebiscite, if it were to finally be held.

For these reasons we urge all supporters of ALAS and colleagues to mark their calendars and to join our brothers and sisters from the ADP this Saturday May 7 at the Ateneo Puertorriqueño in San Juan.

“Remembering always that what we need is the will to take a first step”

Puerto Rican Governor Luis Fortuño

We applaud ALAS and ADP for addressing what we feel is a serious flaw of Governor Fortuño’s Dialogue Committee: denying all interested stakeholders to have a say in how the plebiscite will be shaped.

ALAS was one of the organizations that presented the option of a free associated state to the White House Task Force on Puerto Rico Status, an option that is recognized as legal and valid.

While Governor Fortuño speaks about practicing true American democracy, his recents actions to not include ALAS and ADP in the Dialogue Committee remind us of tactics better served for typical Latin American leaders who would rather keep detractors away in order to keep their agenda unscathed.

Governor Fortuño’s actions are as un-American and unpatriotic as anything we have ever seen. You cannot have it both ways: either practice true and transparent democracy, or else stop promoting your unwavering belief in the uniqueness and openness that is America’s democratic process

Read Full Post »


We are committed to providing comprehensive coverage of Tuesday’s Puerto Rican Status Forum organized by the pro-statehood group, the Center for Puerto Rico Equality and Advancement (CPREA), which was held in the Rayburn Building of the United States House of Representatives.

Speakers included pro-statehooders Puerto Rican Resident Commissioner Pedro Pierluisi and Puerto Rican Secretary of State Kenneth D. McClintock, two of the highest ranking government officials in the administration of Republican Governor Luis Fortuño.

Pierluisi, who is a non-voting member of Congress but is also Congress’ biggest spender, said the following:

The only way we can begin the [statehood] process is by obtaining more than 50% [support on the island.] We have to do a better job and stop making excuses.

We have included pictures of the event. Later today, we plan to have a FULL AUDIO RECORDING of the forum. In addition, we were also able to ask three questions during the Q & A session of the forum. The answers to these questions appear below.

CPREA's Rafael Rodríguez addresses the session

Attendees at Tuesday's Puerto Rican status forum at the US House of Representatives

Puerto Rican Secretary of State and pro-statehooder, Kenneth D. McClintock (center)

Here were the three questions were asked:

Why aren’t the Puerto Rican Independence Party, a legitimate political party, and spokespeople for the new Free Associated State option not at this forum? Doesn’t this send a message that this forum is limited in its democratic scope?

This question was fielded by Mr. Andrés W. López, member of the DNC, He said “like any election, all people who are eligible to participate should participate.  It is up to those who are concerned about the issue to attend these and other meetings dealing with the upcoming plebiscite.”

What is your position on the fact that the White House does not recommend Puerto Ricans born on the island but now living on the mainland cannot vote on the upcoming plebiscite?

This question was fielded by McClintock. He said that everyone in the White House Task Force on Puerto Rico Status agreed that this was the best way to keep non-islanders from controlling the fate of those living on the island.  This was backed by Mr. Howard L. Hills, another panelist, who stated that it would be easy for outside political groups to muddy up the results.

Why will the second phase of the plebiscite be held in 2013? Why can’t it be held in 2012?

This question was fielded by McClintock. He said the decision not to hold the plebiscite in 2012 was to keep it clear of politics and political machines. He felt that if the plebiscite was held in 2012 it would confuse voters, because all the other candidates and referendums that would be introduced in 2012 [US presidential primaries and Puerto Rican gubernatorial elections].  He also said the timing of the plebiscite in 2013 would give a new Congress time to deal with issues that may come up during and after the plebiscite election.

Read Full Post »


Remarks by Kenneth D. McClintock

As prepared for delivery

May 2, 2011

Puerto Rico's Secretary of State Kenneth D. McClintock

The 2011 White House Report on Puerto Rico is a sincere effort at addressing many of Puerto Rico’s problems and providing both a federal as well as local roadmap to address them. It has its flaws, but they are few.

With regard to Puerto Rico’s political status, the report does not state what it cannot state – that nothing is going to happen status wise in Washington during the remaining 19 months of President Obama’s first term.

While Puerto Rico statehood is and has been a part of the Republican Party platform for decades, and several Republicans in Congress have courageously attempted to address this issue and fulfill that commitment, the current scenario within the Republican majority in the House of Representatives and the Republican minority in the Senate precludes any congressional action during this Congress on the issue of Puerto Rico self-determination.

The report fails to acknowledge that reality, but it is an acknowledgement regarding this or any issue that no White House would make halfway into its mandate.

The report does set forth a more realistic local roadmap, one where Puerto Rico can move ahead in the political status chess game to place Congress, sometime in 2013, in the position of having to move on the issue.

While the report doesn’t impose one single route to follow, it does make very constructive suggestions as to the mechanics and content of a local electoral consultation process.

Based on those suggestions, which include the possibility of a two – step consultation that will produce results that will be more understandable by, and credible to Congress, and the need to include the present relationship as an option in order to provide more credibility, Governor Fortuño has made a two -phase proposal:

First, as the leader of the governing party, he proposed a political status resolution process that includes the current status, offers a two-step consultation, and attempts to avoid intermeshing status with the partisan politics of a general election, a proposal that has been endorsed by the Party.

Second, as governor of Puerto Rico, he invited Puerto Rico’s three political status –based registered parties to seek a consensus on a political status process by May 25th.

The consensus-seeking committee, with a representative from each party, held its first meeting 8 days ago in my office and has since held a second meeting. Let us hope for the best.

It is the Governor’s desire that local legislation, preferably by consensus, can be approved by the end of the legislative session in June.

Hopefully, by the time Congress gets down to work in the spring of 2013, the people of Puerto Rico will have withdrawn whatever consent it ever gave to the present relationship and will get down to the business of matching President Obama’s interest in resolving Puerto Rico’s political status problem.

One of the more remarkable status-related aspects of the Report is the Obama administration’s reiteration of the long-standing federal policy that Puerto Rico remains subject to the Territorial Clause of the Constitution.

Before briefly addressing the fascinating non-status related sections of the Report, I would like to put on the table a suggestion of a step that the Obama administration could take to speed things along.

As you may recall, in one of the several so-called “insular cases”, Balzac vs People of Porto Rico, decided in 1922 by U.S. Supreme Court. Chief Justice Taft, also known as former President William Howard Taft, in an act of judicial legislation set aside the precedents of Lousiana and Alaska in declaring that, in Puerto Rico’s case, the 1917 grant of American citizenship did not constitute incorporation and I quote:

It is true that, in the absence of other and countervailing evidence, a law of Congress or a provision in a treaty acquiring territory, declaring an intention to confer political and civil rights on the inhabitants of the new lands as American citizens, may be properly interpreted to mean an incorporation of it into the union, as in the case of Louisiana and Alaska.

This was one of the chief grounds upon which this court placed its conclusion that Alaska had been incorporated in the Union. But Alaska was a very different case from that of Puerto Rico.

It was an enormous territory, very sparsely settled and offering opportunity for immigration and settlement by American citizens. It was on the American continent and within easy reach of the then United States. It involved none of the difficulties which incorporation of the Philippines and Porto Rico presents.’’

While it is settled that the federal Government normally defends the legal status quo, be it a law or established judicial precedent, there are exceptions, the most recent being the refusal to defend the constitutionality of the federal marriage act.

I would suggest that the Obama administration announce that the federal government will no longer support the continued validity of the insular cases and will no longer set policy based on the holding of those cases.

Having said that, let me briefly address some of the economic proposals contained in the report. If Puerto Rico adopts the Report’s proposal to establish an autonomous energy and public utilities regulatory body, the implementation of that recommendation will revolutionize the energy market and provide benefits to consumers.

The report’s endorsement of the Caribbean energy grid project should be used by Puerto Rico to turn our territory into an energy hub that will create jobs, generate economic activity, and provide regional leadership opportunities.

Finally, we should not take lightly the report’s concern for a lack of  a professional class capable of recognizing the need, identifying, requesting, receiving, properly using, reporting and auditing Federal funds.

The absence of that set of skills is due in part to the deficient teaching of English in PR but the lack of understanding that Federal funds come with strings attached.

Puerto Rico should immediately accept the report’s offer to provide technical assistance to fill that void.

In closing, the Report recognizes the importance of the need to resolve our political status issue as well as the need to improve our economy.

A poor republic of Puerto Rico would rapidly look more like Haiti than Chile.

A poor Puerto Rico would have greater difficulty joining the Union.

A poor Puerto Rico only benefits those who cruelly want to keep Puerto Rico as it is.

As a believer in change, change through statehood, I believe in the need to strengthen our economy, within the constraints of our current states, as a prerequisite for status change.

Thank you.

Read Full Post »


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

April 25, 2011

Center for Puerto Rico Equality & Advancement to hold 

Policy Briefing at the U.S. Congress

The Center for Puerto Rico Equality & Advancement (CPREA), an independent and non-partisan policy and education organization that advocates on behalf of civil rights and equality for Puerto Rico, will present its Spring 20ll Status and Economic Policy Briefing Tuesday, May 3rd at the Rayburn Office Building of the U.S. House of Representatives, Room 2237, at 3:00 p.m.  The briefing will include presentations by four panelists followed by a Q&A.

The briefing will focus on the March 2011 Report of the President’s Task Force on Puerto Rico’s Status, which made recommendations to resolve the question of the territory’s future status, regarding Federal programs and the islands; and concerning the insular economy.

Confirmed panelists include: Puerto Rico’s Secretary of State, Kenneth D. McClintock, advisor and counsel on national security and territorial law to the administrations of President’s Reagan and George H.W. Bush, Howard L. Hills; Graduate School of Business of the University of Puerto Rico Professor Carlos A. Colon De Armas; and Democratic National Committee Member Andres W. Lopez.  The moderator will be Jeffrey L. Farrow, coordinator of policy regarding Puerto Rico and other territories in Clinton and Carter White Houses and former Staff Director of the U.S. House of Representatives subcommittee on territories issues.

In the evening, the law firm of Akin/Gump will host a reception and fundraiser for CPREA.

CPREA President Rafael Rodriguez said in announcing the briefing that, “As we seek to deal with Puerto Rico’s territorial status and economy, it is important that we lay out a path to attain true equal social/economic equality for the 3.7 million U.S. citizens of the islands. While staying true to our central message of Civil Rights and Equality for Puerto Rico, this status and economic policy discussion will strongly argue why Puerto Rico’s territorial status is in the way of economic growth and potential, and why there can be no parity without equality.”

The Center for Puerto Rico Equality & Advancement (CPREA) is committed to advancing a bold, innovative course of policy analysis, education, and action aimed at empowering the people of Puerto Rico to attain their full rights – and discharge their full responsibilities – as citizens of the United States of America.

Read Full Post »


Here is what the pro-statehood Center for Puerto Rico Equality and Advancement (CPREA) had to say about President Obama’s Task Force on Puerto Rico’s Status report.

As the Report of the President’s Task Force on Puerto Rico’s Status makes clear once again, democracy at the national government level and full equality under the American flag is only achievable through statehood. Polls in Puerto Rico have shown pretty consistent growth in support for statehood. The 2008 elections gave Puerto Rico’s elected officials a mandate to enable a status choice that will lead to an end of the colonial status. It is time for that choice.

The Report of the President’s Task Force is detailed and comprehensive. It lays out many possible processes for resolving the question of the territory’s status. Most important, it should put an end to the debate about whether “Commonwealth” must be a territory status. The Obama Task Force agreed with past Federal administrations of both national political parties that under “Commonwealth” Puerto Rico remains subject to the broad authority of the Federal government—in which Puerto Rico has no votes—to govern unincorporated territories as it sees fit, limited only by the fundamental rights of individuals, and that Puerto Rico would remain subject to this authority under any “Commonwealth” arrangement.

The Popular Democratic Party’s dream of an “enhanced Commonwealth status,” one that would be permanent and end Federal territory governing authority is simply unachievable.

The leaders of the PPD need to decide if they want a Puerto Rico to continue as a territory without votes in its national government and equality for Puerto Ricans with other U.S. citizens or the territory should have the democracy, equality, and dignity that is only possible through nationhood or statehood – with statehood being the only status that offers this under the U.S. flag.

The Center for Puerto Rico Equality and Advancement (CPREA) calls upon the leaders of the PPD to accept the realities of the status options, stop trying to misinterpret the Report of the President’s Task Force to confuse people about its plain meaning, give up making impossible status proposals that delay resolution of the issue, and stop trying to impede the people of Puerto Rico from choosing their preference among possible statuses.

CPREA applauds the Task Force report for dissipating fears concerning Puerto Rico’s language and culture. As in other states of our union, Puerto Rico’s culture, language, and identity under statehood would be a part of the fabric that has made our Nation great. English would continue to play the same important role in Puerto Rico as it does today.

The Report of the Task Force should lead to a growth in the ranks of the statehood movement by burying myths about the status options as loyal American Puerto Ricans who have been misled by the PPD realize that the only way to obtain full democracy, equality, and security and, at the same time, to continue to enjoy our rich linguistic and cultural heritage is through statehood. This should lead to a majority of Puerto Ricans choosing statehood in a choice among real status options.

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

%d bloggers like this: