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Posts Tagged ‘US House of Represenatives’


In what is a very bizarre political marriage, Puerto Rican Republican Governor and pro-statehooder Luis Fortuño has been showcased on Fox News as a “rising star of the Republican Party.” The following videos from Fox confirm that the promotion of Fortuño has been calculated and deliberate.

Meanwhile, Fortuño, who has still not commented about the highly charged critical comments made US Congressman Luis Gutiérrez on the floor of Congress, is now being rumored as a possible VP candidate for Republican Presidential contender Mitt Romney. If that bizarre rumor were to become true, would Fortuño need to reside officially in a US state on the mainland, since right now his living in Puerto Rico would not make him eligible to run for the VP office? We think that all this Republican lovefest for Fortuño is a bit premature, since the governor would need to leave his post in San Juan before the end of his term in 2013.

Governor Luis Fortuño

As the post about Fortuño’s vice presidential hopes states:

Taking a page out of the Democrats play book the Republican Party may be quietly weighing the possibilities of a surprise 2012 Presidential Ticket of Mitt Romney and Puerto Rico Govenor Luis Fortuño.

One very clear indicator of this possibility, as well as Democrats fear of such a move, is the following recent quote by Andrew Romano of the Liberal Mouthpiece Newsweek Magazine:

“Allow me, then, to introduce you. Fortuño is the governor of Puerto Rico, which, as you may have learned in fifth-grade social-studies class, is a United States commonwealth located to the east of the Dominican Republic in the Caribbean Sea. Yes, Fortuño is a U.S. citizen. And, yes, he is a true-blue, Reagan- and National Review-loving member of the GOP—despite the liberal leanings of his native island”

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111th CONGRESS 2d Session

H. R. 2499


AN ACT

To provide for a federally sanctioned self-determination process for the people of Puerto Rico.

    Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

    This Act may be cited as the `Puerto Rico Democracy Act of 2010′.

SEC. 2. FEDERALLY SANCTIONED PROCESS FOR PUERTO RICO’S SELF-DETERMINATION.

    (a) First Plebiscite- The Government of Puerto Rico is authorized to conduct a plebiscite in Puerto Rico. The 2 options set forth on the ballot shall be preceded by the following statement: `Instructions: Mark one of the following 2 options:
    • `(1) Puerto Rico should continue to have its present form of political status. If you agree, mark here XX.
    • `(2) Puerto Rico should have a different political status. If you agree, mark here XX.’.
    (b) Procedure if Majority in First Plebiscite Favors Option 1- If a majority of the ballots in the plebiscite are cast in favor of Option 1, the Government of Puerto Rico is authorized to conduct additional plebiscites under subsection (a) at intervals of every 8 years from the date that the results of the prior plebiscite are certified under section 3(d).
    (c) Procedure if Majority in First Plebiscite Favors Option 2- If a majority of the ballots in a plebiscite conducted pursuant to subsection (a) or (b) are cast in favor of Option 2, the Government of Puerto Rico is authorized to conduct a plebiscite on the following 4 options:
    • (1) Independence: Puerto Rico should become fully independent from the United States. If you agree, mark here XX.
    • (2) Sovereignty in Association with the United States: Puerto Rico and the United States should form a political association between sovereign nations that will not be subject to the Territorial Clause of the United States Constitution. If you agree, mark here XX.
    • (3) Statehood: Puerto Rico should be admitted as a State of the Union. If you agree, mark here XX.
    • (4) Commonwealth: Puerto Rico should continue to have its present form of political status. If you agree, mark here XXX.

SEC. 3. APPLICABLE LAWS AND OTHER REQUIREMENTS.

    (a) Applicable Laws- All Federal laws applicable to the election of the Resident Commissioner shall, as appropriate and consistent with this Act, also apply to any plebiscites held pursuant to this Act. Any reference in such Federal laws to elections shall be considered, as appropriate, to be a reference to the plebiscites, unless it would frustrate the purposes of this Act.
    (b) Rules and Regulations- The Puerto Rico State Elections Commission shall issue all rules and regulations necessary to carry out the plebiscites under this Act.
    (c) Eligibility To Vote- Each of the following shall be eligible to vote in any plebiscite held under this Act:
    • (1) All eligible voters under the electoral laws in effect in Puerto Rico at the time the plebiscite is held.
    • (2) All United States citizens born in Puerto Rico who comply, to the satisfaction of the Puerto Rico State Elections Commission, with all Commission requirements (other than the residency requirement) applicable to eligibility to vote in a general election in Puerto Rico. Persons eligible to vote under this subsection shall, upon timely request submitted to the Commission in compliance with any terms imposed by the Electoral Law of Puerto Rico, be entitled to receive an absentee ballot for the plebiscite.
    (d) Certification of Plebiscite Results- The Puerto Rico State Elections Commission shall certify the results of any plebiscite held under this Act to the President of the United States and to the Members of the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States.
    (e) English Language Requirements- The Puerto Rico State Elections Commission shall–
    • (1) ensure that all ballots used for any plebiscite held under this Act include the full content of the ballot printed in English;
    • (2) inform persons voting in any plebiscite held under this Act that, if Puerto Rico retains its current political status or is admitted as a State of the United States, the official language requirements of the Federal Government shall apply to Puerto Rico in the same manner and to the same extent as throughout the United States; and
    • (3) inform persons voting in any plebiscite held under this Act that, if Puerto Rico retains its current political status or is admitted as a State of the United States, it is the Sense of Congress that it is in the best interest of the United States for the teaching of English to be promoted in Puerto Rico as the language of opportunity and empowerment in the United States in order to enable students in public schools to achieve English language proficiency.
    (f) Plebiscite Costs- All costs associated with any plebiscite held under this Act (including the printing, distribution, transportation, collection, and counting of all ballots) shall be paid for by the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico.

Passed the House of Representatives April 29, 2010.

Attest:

Clerk.

111th CONGRESS 2d Session

H. R. 2499

AN ACT

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In light of the new developments occurring at the University of Puerto Rico as reported by Fox News Latino, Illinois Rep. Luis V. Gutiérrez (D) spoke from the floor of the House of Representatives to focus more attention on Puerto Rico’s political status. Here is the video of Rep. Gutiérrez’s remarks:

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